Happening Now

Search This Blog

Tuesday, 17 January 2017

Trump kicks against US spending on Boko Haram




US President-elect, Donald Trump, said he has seen no need for America to continue spending money fighting Boko Haram terror group in Nigeria and itsneighbours. Trump’s comments are coming just five days to his inauguration as US President.

Trump queried why the United State was still spending money to fight the Boko Haram insurgency in Nigeria, why all of the schoolgirls kidnapped by the group have not been rescued and whether Qaeda operatives from Africa are living in the United States. He questioned the effectiveness of one
of the more significant counterterrorism efforts on the continent.

According to New York Times, Trump in a four-page write up raised Africa-related questions. “How does U.S. business compete with other nations in Africa? Are we losing out to the Chinese?” asks one of the first questions in the unclassified document provided to The New York Times. That was quickly followed with queries about humanitarian assistance money. “With so much corruption in Africa, how much of our funding is stolen? Why should we spend these funds on Africa when we are suffering here in the U.S.? Some of the questions are those that should be asked by a new administration seeking to come to grips with the hows and whys behind longstanding American national security and foreign assistance policies.

But it is difficult to know whether the probing, critical tone of other questions indicates that significant policy changes should be expected. On terrorism, the document asks why the United States is even bothering to fight the Boko Haram insurgency in Nigeria, why all of the schoolgirls kidnapped by the group have not been rescued and whether Qaeda operatives from Africa are living in the United States.
And it questions the effectiveness of one of the more significant counterterrorism efforts on the continent. “We have been fighting alShabaab for a decade, why haven’t we won?” poses one question, referring to the terrorist group based in Somalia that was behind the Westgate mall attacks in Kenya in 2013.

Although the document represents a first look at how the new administration might approach policy toward Africa, a subject that was rarely touched on during the campaign, officials with the Trump transition team did not respond to queries about the list.




No comments:

Post a Comment